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Benjamin Bergen

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member Benjamin Bergen featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words”

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

Design Lab member and UC San Diego Cognitive Science professor Benjamin Bergen was featured as an expert in “History of Swear Words,” a new Netflix comedy series exploring the usage of and science behind cursing. Bergen is the author of “What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves” and “Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning“.

Watch the full series now on Netflix!

Benjamin Bergen / Picture Credit: Netflix

Check out the trailer here:

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Bennett Peji

Meet Designer-in-Residence Bennett Peji

When Bennett Peji was asked to join The Design Lab as a Designer-in-Residence, he immediately said yes. “It was a natural fit,” he explains. “The Design Lab is composed of so many talented people, both in leadership and in its students, who have tremendous technical abilities, but also a big heart for using that expertise for the greater good.” Peji works with the Community team at The Design Lab, working on ways to define what it means for San Diego to be a global city. He is the Chief Innovation Officer at several businesses and Chairman of California Humanities. “Seeing us all collectively as being a very unique region in the world is one distinguishing factor in developing the opportunities that we have here. My role is to be a connector and a bridge builder to organizations who are like-minded. Like-minded in terms of seeing our region holistically and working for more ways to collaborate and create greater economic opportunities and access.”

Peji is a walking example of practicing what he preaches in order to present San Diego as a unique, diverse, global city. He emphasizes that it is not enough to just be welcoming. We must be truly inclusive. “The real work is to include and empower the folks who have never been to the table, who don't think and act and see the world the way we do, so that we can all have a more profound way of looking at the problems.” To do this, Peji has not been afraid to be the one swimming upstream. “We all have to find our way in this world called America and do the best we can. But since I’ve been on this journey for so long now, it has become so clear that it is not about assimilating [but instead] finding your own voice and expressing your own unique and distinct identity.”

How They Got There: Janet Johnson

Graduate student Janet Johnson is currently working towards her doctorate degree in Computer Science, while also conducting HCI research in the UCSD Design Lab, primarily focusing on XR (extended reality).

So, what is Johnson’s research?  Johnson conducts HCI research, primarily focusing on XR. As Johnson describes it, “XR is an umbrella term for augmented reality, augmented virtuality, mixed reality, and virtual reality.” She says to think of it as a spectrum where one end is the real world alone, the other is complete virtual reality, and everything in between is varying mixes of the two. Johnson’s research primarily focuses on this mixed middle ground. “The majority of my research focuses on how we can use mixed reality or extended reality to help a novice…get help from an expert.” She then poses the example of both surgery and CPR. Johnson’s research explores ways for an expert to provide instructions to the novice as if though they were in the same room. Her goal is to help bridge the distance between novices and experts, both physically and skill wise, while also decreasing the amount of time a person receives aid. “By the time a medical personnel arrives at the scene, it’s already been 7 to 10 minutes, so each minute counts for the person’s life,” she explains. “You don’t have time in that 10 minutes to train the people around to be able to do CPR or any other sort of resuscitation, same with surgery.” 

As Johnson continues to conduct her research in this field, she’s excited for what the future holds for this technology and the ways she can contribute to it.  
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